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Sunday, October 18, 2020 | History

3 edition of Charles Whittingham the Younger and the Chiswick Press, 1852-59 found in the catalog.

Charles Whittingham the Younger and the Chiswick Press, 1852-59

Janet Ing Freeman

Charles Whittingham the Younger and the Chiswick Press, 1852-59

by Janet Ing Freeman

  • 50 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by University Microfilms International in Ann Arbor, Mich .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Whittingham, Charles, -- 1795-1876.,
  • Chiswick Press.,
  • Printers -- England -- London -- Biography.,
  • Printing -- England -- London -- History.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Janet Thompson.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination1 microfilm reel
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17458001M

    London: Charles Whittingham at the Chiswick Press, Edition ltd. to copies ( reserved for the Rowfant Club), 8vo, (22) & pp., photogravure frontis, with . In , his nephew, Charles Whittingham II, became his partner. In , his nephew opened his own printing company in London. Upon his death , his nephew took management of Chiswick Press, which stayed in business until even though not owned by the Whittingham family.

    Charles Whittingham printed the work on handmade paper in black-letter type for Pickering, who, inspired by the printing of Aldus Manutius, published in a series of six such facsimiles of important editions of the Book of Common Prayer, each of which was illustrated with wood-engraved initials and ornaments done by Mary Byfield, and. Businessman. He gained notoriety in the s for being the owner of Chiswick Press, a very successful business, which his uncle, Charles Whittington, had started west of London, England in In , he became a partner in his uncle's printing business. His uncle was considered the .

    Westminster: Archibald Constable and Co. [Printed by Charles Whittingham and Co. at the Chiswick Press], One of small paper copies. pp. 1 vols. 4to. A very useful work for the Coleridge scholar. With the bound in slip regarding more. Book printer, nephew of Charles Whittingham (), from whom he took over the Chiswick business; worked in partnership with his uncle between .


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Charles Whittingham the Younger and the Chiswick Press, 1852-59 by Janet Ing Freeman Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Chiswick Press was founded by Charles Whittingham I (–) in The management of the Press was taken over in by the founder's nephew Charles Whittingham II (–). The name was first used inand the Press continued to operate until Get this from a library.

Charles Whittingham the Younger and the Chiswick Press, dissertation. [Janet Thompson Ing; University Microfilms International.]. Ing, Janet Thompson. “Charles Whittingham the Younger and the Chiswick Press, ” Ph.D. dissertation, University of California at Berkeley, Opening showing wood engravings of a bearded vulture; and other aquatic birds, including wild swans The influence of Bewick’s History of British birds is plainly discernible in this reproduction of a work printed at the Chiswick Press by Charles Whittingham the elder () in By this time the use of wood engraving as a means of book illustration was well established and.

tion, "Charles Whittingham the Younger and the Chiswick Press, " (Uni versity of California, Berkeley, ). Great Britain, Parliamentary Papers (Commons),vol.

"Children's Employment Commission: Fifth Report of the Commissioners," pp. On the death of his uncle in the Chiswick Press business passed into the hands of the younger Whittingham.

He carried on the works at Chiswick as well as at Took's Court untiland the books printed at both places bore the imprint of Chiswick Press. In he became a liveryman of the Company of Stationers.

The lease at Took's Court. Chiswick Press (London) RA Collection: People and Organisations The Chiswick Press was founded by Charles Whittingham I (–) in The management of the Press was taken over in by the founder's nephew Charles Whittingham II (–).

The name was first used inand the Press continued to operate until C. Despite his snub of the larger publishers, the Chiswick's Press fine use of ornamentation became much sought-after, and itself was one of the key inspirations for William Morris's own, elaborate and elegant designs. The Chiswick Press opened formally inwhen Whittingham had amassed enough clients to make the business viable.

After four years the younger Whittingham left to set up shop independently in London. From until the work of the two presses was distinct. When the elder Whittingham died in the younger Whittingham inherited the Chiswick Press.

In the younger Whittingham had met the publisher, book dealer, and typophile, William Pickering. Whittingham died in and the press was acquired by George Bell who retained the name of Charles Whittingham and Co.

Charles Thomas Jacobi, born in London inwas managing editor of the Chiswick Press and a writer and lecturer on printing.

From the guide to the Chiswick Press records, (The New York Public Library. Whittingham, Charles hwĭt´ĭnjəm, –ĭng-əm, –, English printer. He established a printery in London inremoving to Chiswick and founding the Chiswick Press in He was assisted in his work by his nephew, also named Charles Whittingham, –, who succeeded him.

The younger Whittingham revived the use of Caslon's. Whittingham, Charles (hwĭt`ĭnjəm, –ĭng-əm), –, English printer. He established a printery in London inremoving to Chiswick and founding the Chiswick Press in He was assisted in his work by his nephew, also named Charles Whittingham, –, who succeeded him.

The younger Whittingham revived the use of Caslon's. Whittingham, Charles,printer: Sacred dramas: chiefly intended for young persons.

The subjects taken from the Bible / (Chiswick: From the Chiswick Press, by C. Whittingham ; London: Sold by R. Jennings, Poultry, ), also by Hannah More, Robert Jennings, and printer Chiswick Press (page images at HathiTrust). The Chiswick Press was a 19th-century British publishing company.

The press was founded by Charles Whittingham I (16 June – 5 January ), an English printer. Whittington was born at Caludon or Calledon, Warwickshire]], the son of a farmer, and was apprenticed to a Coventry printer and bookseller.

In he set up a small printing press in a garret off Fleet Street, London, with a. Charles Whittingham the Younger and the Chiswick Press, by Janet Thompson () Ecce mundus: industrial ideals, and the book beautiful by T.

J Cobden-Sanderson (Book). Charles Whittingham (16 June – 5 January ) was an English printer. Biography. He was born at Caludon or Calledon, Warwickshire, the son of a farmer, and was apprenticed to a Coventry printer and bookseller.

In he set up a small printing press in a garret off Fleet Street, London, with a loan obtained from the typefounding firm of William Caslon, and, byhis business had. WHITTINGHAM, CHARLES (–), ‘the uncle,’ printer and founder of the Chiswick Press, born on 16 June at Stoke Farm, Caludon or Calledon, in Warwickshire, three miles from Coventry, was the youngest child of Charles Whittingham, a farmer.

He was apprenticed to Richard Bird, printer, bookseller, and stationer of Coventry, on years the younger Whittingham left to set up shop indepenbently in London.

From until the work of the two presses was distinct. Wheg the elder Whittingham died in the younger Whittingham inherited the Chiswick Press. In the younger Whittingham had met the publisher, book dealer, and typophile, William Pickering. The publisher of Artists at Home, Sampson Low (–), was originally a bookseller with a shop at 42 Lamb’s Conduit Street, Bloomsbury, founded in On JSampson Low announced the “opening of a subscription library and reading room that would be regularly supplied with the morning and evening newspapers, periodical publications, and all new works of interest.”.

Samuel Rogers came to the Chiswick Press for the ‘Notes’ to his ‘Italy’ (). The years and were of great importance in the annals of the Chiswick Press, as they marked the introduction of the old-fashioned style of book production for which Whittingham and.

The younger Whittingham revived the use of Caslon's old-style type in The printery returned to London in The Chiswick Press printed admirable editions of numerous books for the London publisher William Pickering.

Source for information on Whittingham, Charles: The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. dictionary.Charles Whittingham (16 June January ) was an English printer. Biography. He was born at Caludon or Calledon, Warwickshire, the son of a farmer, and was apprenticed to a Coventry printer and bookseller.

In he set up a small printing press in a garret off Fleet Street, London, with a loan obtained from the typefounding firm of William Caslon, and, byhis business had so.'Printed at the Chiswick Press' [ Chiswick Press: Printed by Whittingham and Wilkins, Tooks Court, Chancery Lane ].

[ Sharman's address dated from 'Covent Garden, | May, ' £